Monday, September 7, 2015

Secret and Mysterious Places You're Not Allowed to Visit

The world is a big place and there are a lot of undiscovered places. You'd be surprised to know that there are discovered places that the public is not allowed access to. Aside from the horribly-kept secret Area 51, there are other parts of the world with so much historical value, only selected scientists/scholars are allowed access to them.

Here are a few of those places:
  • Poveglia Island, Italy

    One of the scariest places in the world. During the Roman Era, Poveglia Island was used to isolate plague victims from the general population. The Black Death arrived centuries later and they dumped residents that showed the least bit of sickness were thrown into the island. They were set ablaze on top of rotting corpses regardless if they were men, women or children. It's estimated that the island saw at least 160,000 deaths.

  • The Vatican Secret Archives, Italy

    Accessible by only a few selected scholars (and even the scholars only have access to few parts of the library), the Vatican Secret Archives or Library has records of a lot of confidential historical documents.

  • Chapel of the Ark of the Covenant, Ethiopia

    The Church of Our Lady Mary of Zion is impossible to access because it’s claimed to contain one of the most important biblical objects, the original Ark of the Covenant, which according to tradition came to Ethiopia with Menelik I after he visited his father King Solomon.

  • Tomb of Qin Shi Huang, China

    The Mausoleum of the First Qin Emperor (Qin Shi Huang) is located in Lintong District, Xi'an, Shaanxi province of China. This mausoleum was constructed over 38 years, from 246 to 208 BC, and is situated underneath a 76-meter-tall tomb mound. Only time will tell if China will open the site to excavations and archaeological teams.

  • Lascaux Caves, France

    Found in South West France, Lascaux is complex of caves that are world-renowned for its Palaeolithic cave paintings that are estimated to be over 17,500 years old. Although these caves were once open to the public, they have since been closed to preserve the original artwork. Only one person entry per week but only for a maximum of 20 minutes just to check the artworks.

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Via Conspiracy Club

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